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Abbey Meadows Community Primary SchoolGrowing Together

Curriculum

Abbey Meadows combines high standards with a broad and rich curriculum. Great emphasis is placed on planning so that there is continuity, progression, challenge and pace. In foundation stage, the children follow EYFS. This curriculum is based around the following 7 broad subheadings;

 

  • Knowledge and Understanding of the World
  • Problem Solving, Reasoning and Numeracy
  • Creative Development
  • Communication, Language and Literacy
  • Physical Development
  • Personal, Social and Emotional Development

In key stage 1 and 2, we follow our own schemes of work based on the new national curriculum. Our schemes of work are developed to meet the needs of our children. On the class pages you will find a topic overview for each year group. 

 

Each half-term Class Teachers send home a curriculum newsletter with more details about what your child is learning.

The aims of the primary national curriculum

  • To ensure that the curriculum embodies rigour and high standards and creates coherence in what is taught in schools
  • To ensure that all children are taught the essential knowledge in the key subject disciplines and master all aspects of each module
  • To allow teachers greater freedom to use their professionalism and expertise to help all children reach their potential
  • Content is slimmed down in all subjects except for English, Maths and Science
  • Teachers are not told what to teach, rather the focus is on the essential knowledge and skills every child should have, giving teachers freedom in shaping the curriculum to suit their pupils' needs
  • Children are required to cover subjects two years earlier than peers in top performing nation

What will our children actually be taught?

All our Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 children will be taught English, Maths, Science, Art and Design, Computing, Geography, History, Music and PE. Key Stage 2 children must also study a foreign language. Here's a breakdown by topic:

 

Phonics

  • We follow the Letters and Sounds programme 
  • Letters and Sounds Leaflet for parents

English

  • Phonics and reading for pleasure is a priority
  • Less of a focus on genre and more on quality writing
  • Big emphasis on spoken English; debating, reciting poetry and presenting skills
  • Handwriting will not be assessed but is required to be fluent, legible and speedy

Maths

  • Five year olds are expected to be able to count to 100 (it was previously 20) and learn number bonds to 20 rather than 10
  • They will also be required to understand fractions such as 1/4 and 1/2
  • By age nine, all children should know their times tables up to 12×12 rather than 10×10
  • Focus on mental maths; so no calculators until the end of Key Stage 2
  • Children should understand Roman Numerals and will study Binary Code in Year Six

Science

  • Medicines, light and sound, electricity and magnetism all moved up to Key Stage 2 leaving less content in Key Stage 1
  • An emphasis on working scientifically
  • Evolution introduced in Year Six

Computing

  • A big focus on computer programming; from age five, children will learn to write and rest simple programs and organise, store and retrieve data, understand what algorithms are and how programmes work
  • By age seven, children should understand what computer networks are, including the internet
  • Internet safety will now be taught from age five (used to only be taught from age 11-16)

Design & Technology

  • Greater importance under new curriculum to encourage children to pursue engineering and design
  • More sophisticated use of design equipment such as electronics and robotics
  • Key Stage 2 focus on key events and individuals in design technology

Art

  • Children will use a range of materials and techniques and learn about great artists

Geography

  • Key Stage 1 focus on the UK and factual knowledge of continents and oceans
  • Europe and America covered at Key Stage 2

History

  • Key Stage 1 will focus on changes within living memory, on events beyond living memory, significant individuals and significant local industry
  • Key Stage 2 will focus on chronological progressions through the history of Britain (early Britons to Edward the confessor)
  • Children will carry out a local historical study and a study of an aspect or theme that extends knowledge beyond 1066

Languages

  • Focus on making significant progress in ONE language in Key Stage 2

Physical Education

  • By the end of Key Stage 2, children should be able to perform a safe self-rescue in different water-based situations

How will we measure and assess progress?

The curriculum places the emphasis on formative assessment rather than a focus on end of term testing or summative assessment. For those children who struggle with the pressure of exams, this new system should present them with a more relaxed approach to testing.

 

With the removal of levels, we will use the national curriculum expectations and have developed a curriculum that teaches this content. This includes an assessment system that enables us to check if pupils are making progress.

 

Children will therefore no longer be judged on whether they are making two levels of progress between Key Stage 1 and 2 but will be judged against the average progress made by pupils made within the same baseline. We have adopted a Mastery Curriculum which measures whether children are 'Entering, Developing, Meeting or Exceeding' objectives.

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